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Tuesday
Jul152014

The Emeco Chair

In 1944, Witton C. Dinges, collaborated with Alcoa experts to design the first Emeco Navy Chair, for use on submarines as 'war ship ready' furniture. This eye-pleasing, durable and lightweight chair caught the attention of many famous architects and designers over the years, including Frank Gehry and Norman Foster. Over 70 years later, this iconic chair is still being made with the same 77 step design process.

My favorite reincarnation of the original, however, is the collaboration between Emeco and Atlanta based company, Coca-Cola, which sought to alleviate the burden of excess consumer waste. 

As the Emeco Navy chairs are made with 80% recycled aluminum, this particular version is made with recycled Coca Cola bottles. This chair debuted in Milan in 2010 and received rave reviews. It's cheaper than its original counterpart (find here for $260) and is named The Emeco 111 as each chair is made from 111 recycled Coca Cola bottles. 

An impressive 20,000 recycled bottles are sent to New United Resource Recovery Corporation in Spartanburg, South Carolina each weekday to be sorted, ground, wet and dry washed, then sorted by color. After much processing and rendering, 13 pounds of plastic pellets are melted down and injected into each chair mold. Next, the chairs are hollowed out via gas injection, then tempered and cooled. 

The chairs then head to Bemis Manufacturing in Lenoir, North Carolina and BASF in Chattanooga, Tennessee for all the final tweaking and coloring. As stated on dwell.com, "This final laying on of hands, labor intensive though it may be, is the hallmark of Emeco's Navy Chair legacy." 

Each 111 Navy Chair is just like the aluminum original, even including the faux weld points on the backside. I love that this beauty is made in the South with a sincere care for integrity and quality. Find your very own Emeco 111 Navy Chair, which I dare say will never go out of style, here. 

And for those seeking options, the 111 also comes in five colors, including Green Grass and Persimmon Orange. Dreamy...

 

Photos: Emeco; dwell.com; mocoloco.com; e-side.co.uk; moleculeblog.blogspot.com       Content: Sweet Peach

 

Monday
Jul142014

Marc Nelson

When a guy finds the right cut of jeans for his style and size, it shows. A good pair of jeans is worth every penny as they can be worn for years, getting better with time and wear. 

Marcus Hall grew up in Knoxville, Tennessee- a part of the country where denim once provided a livelihood for much of the community. In 1997, 1800 workers were laid off at the Levi Strauss plant in Knoxville. When it shut down, so did many local restaurants and shops, deteriorating the community. Recently, Marcus Hall had a dream that consumed him- to help this community he called home and follow his passion for fashion. In 2011, he began Marc Nelson, his own denim based clothing line, inside that old Levi Strauss building. 

'Marc' is what Marcus' mom calls him and 'Nelson' pays tribute to his first fashion hero-his grandfather, L.C. Nelson. In just a few years, his 100% made in the USA, craft denim collection has grown in popularity to include straight, slim straight, ultra slim and slim boot styles. 

The Marc Nelson jeans are traditional and modern. As Marcus shared with Metro Pulse, "I'd call it 'conservative grunge.' I'm from the South and I know we're not as wild or flamboyant as people in LA. And I really like the workforce wear here. 'Blue collar elegance,' that's another expression I use for my line."

Marcus learned to sew at age 12 and having liltte access to new clothing as a kid, he often visited the local Goodwill to improvise. Marcus, "I'd go to Goodwill, get an old suit and tweak it- trim collars, change buttons, shorten lengths, turn a bootcut into a straight leg and I'd get noticed." His tenacity and knack for fashion has paid off. Although the denim world is a big ocean to swim in, he's slowly establishing his high quality jeans and brand. 

Find Marc Nelson jeans in over 15 locations throughout the country or through Marcus' website, here. 

 

Photos: Marc Nelson site; Shawn Poynter (pics of Marcus)     Content: Sweet Peach


Friday
Jul112014

Botanical Prints

Botanical prints are a great go-to for artwork in your own home, particularly the vintage pieces. I think it's fair to say I haven't come across one I didn't want. 


The good thing is, they're easy to find. Antique and flea markets, Etsy, local shops and markets. Plus, they're easy to download off the internet. Poppytalk offers six botanical prints you can download and print for free. So there's no excuse not to bring a little nature- and charm, inside. Enjoy your weekend everyone. 

 

 

Photos: Stadshem; followpics.co; Lonny Mag; designrulz.com; Architectural Digest; Sopie Wilson; surfingbird.ru; Brittany Ambridge; Casa Sugar; Pernille Folcarelli     Content: Sweet Peach


Thursday
Jul102014

The Indoor Swing

It's summer in the South and I like to sway. I do this every day, rain or shine on my swing bed. During this July heat, as I drift side to side on another breezeless day, it gets me thinking how important it is to have a swing in this summer heat. And not just outside...

As I researched indoor swings, I came across some photos that are sure to inspire. The best part is it doesn't take much to make one- just some wood, rope and a bit of space. Then sway away...


What I like too about a swing is it encourages play. It helps you get out of your head for a bit and let go of worry, doubt and all those other little fears that may creep up during the day. To sway feels good, no matter your age, no matter when or where. Just sway...

 

Photos:  vtwonen.nl; babyromo.com; carpenteria2santos.blogspot.com; estiloescandinavo.com; homespace.kz; ioalndapujol.tumblr.com; Ouno Design; ourpicturewindow.blogspot.ae; outletaoo.net; top-interior-designs.com; youaretheriver.com; Desire to Inspire; Domino       Content: Sweet Peach

Wednesday
Jul092014

Black Swamp Co.

A wooden cuff always has my complete attention and admiration. Artist Katie Thompson of Eutawville, South Carolina is well aware of the allure and has capitalized on it with a line of distinctive jewelry made from wood, metal and locally sourced materials. Her popular spiral cuff is made from a felled Cypress tree in her backyard swamp, estimated to be 1000+ years old. 

As she is a partner (along with her husband) of Joseph Thompson Woodworks, Katie found inspiration in their shared workspace. The number of wood shavings found on any given day led her to recycle these pieces to create something original, structural and visually appealing. 

The process to create each cuff is labor intensive. Katie, "I steam bend these using a steam box and then form by hand. They cure for a day or so, then I'm able to hand chisel, saw, sand and finish using a UV and waterproof finish, which takes another day or so to cure."  

I'm as much a fan of the necklaces as I am of the bracelets. These beauties are handcrafted from local South Carolina black walnut and work well for designers and artists- admirers of function and form.

This is Katie's backyard swamp where she finds endless inspiration. Katie, "I feel like the swamp has accepted me in its gritty and sometimes dangerous beauty and I'm obviously aiming to honor what I see in that relationship, even subconsciously." I'm looking forward to seeing that relationship evolve. See all of Katie's handiwork, (which I first spotted on the Oysters and Pearls site) here.

 

Photos: Black Swamp Co      Content: Sweet Peach


Tuesday
Jul082014

Amy Roberson 

Last weekend, I stopped in to see the ICE event in Atlanta, which celebrates local artists. There was a lot of great talent packed inside but one booth stood out. Perhaps it was the luscious colors, the pretty display or the mid century vibe...but I was instantly smitten by Amy Roberson's ceramics.

Amy is from Ellijay, Georgia and is currently a year long resident at MudFire in Decatur. It is here that she's found a home base with community support and access to all her firing needs- all the while crafting and honing her own style of ceramics. 

Amy, "With my work, I set out to make finely crafted tableware for daily use. I want my audience to use my work to brighten their day with beautiful colors and forms." 

In Amy's newly curated shop, find her mugs, bowls and tumblers. You can also find them at Crafted Westside. It's a nice way to brighten up a space - and support a new, talented artist. 

 

Photos: Amy Roberson Ceramics      Content: Sweet Peach

 

Monday
Jul072014

Dedicate Brand


With America on my mind this weekend, this cool trucker hat caught my eye, by Dedicate Brand. 

This company has great intentions. As stated on their site, "We make functional gear for those who like classic style and who don't want to be walking billboards for the corporations." They've design each item to be used and abused- lived in, thrown in backpacks and back pockets. 

Although based in Wyoming, they have some quality options for the diehard Texan. See the entirety of their manly wares, here.

 

Photos: Dedicate Brand     Content: Sweet Peach


Thursday
Jul032014

Sweet Petunia 

My friends Monica and Chris (who I just featured in the Low Country Boil post) recently began fostering a pup named Petunia. She is about 3 years old, weighs 50 lbs and is believed to be a Bulldog/Boxer mix with perhaps a breed or two or three more mixed in... She is as sweet as can be and needs a place to call home.  

Monica, "Petunia is mellow to the point of sometimes being mistaken for a piece of furniture. She never barks or chews and she barely sheds. She is not a 'bolter' and we often hang out on the porch watching the world go by with no fear of her chasing squirrels, cars or strollers. She loves her crate and will nap there throughout the day and night. She is learning to walk on a leash and gets better at it every day."

Petunia is lucky to also have another pup in her foster family. Her name is Magnolia, whom Chris and Monica adopted last year. The two get along beautifully and seem to have the same temperment. Every time I stop by, Magnolia and Petunia are often lounging side by side, perfectly chill under the hot southern sun.  

Monica and Chris often call Petunia by her new nickname, Potato. Monica, "We call her Potato because all she really wants to do is snooze on the couch." 

I've worked with a lot of kids and animals over the years but happy to report that Petunia was one of the easiest. She's as laid back as they come but certainly appreciated a treat or two to accommodate our many requests to sit here, there, then look over this way, no that way...

She did like rolling around in the petunias...

...but did not appreciate them placed upon her head. Good sport though- she at least let me get the shot. 

Monica and Chris are fostering Petunia through a wonderful organization called Ruffus Rescue in Atlanta, which do weekly adoptions at the Pet Supplies Plus location from 11am-4pm. You can find Petunia there on the weekends, or contact Monica directly to schedule a time to meet. You really can't find a better pup (or foster parents). I hope this July 4th, we can celebrate a new home for this very sweet, loving, adorable Miss Petunia. 

 

Photos and Content: Sweet Peach


Wednesday
Jul022014

Banner Butter

Oh butter, how I love you so. Yet I never knew our love could deepen and evolve the way it has over the last couple of months. Because of you, I'm more open to receive and feel gratitude...

My love for butter has evolved because I never knew what I was missing. Our popular American versions pale in comparison to how its been done for centuries in Europe. At Banner Butter, based in Doraville, Georgia, a talented team is creating quite the buzz by getting back to basics and crafting small batch, cultured butter. They are just one of a few retail cultured butter companies in the whole country.

As owner Elizabeth McBath explained, "Sweet cream butter (your standard grocery store variety) is pasteurized and immediately churned to kill both good and bad bacteria. Cultured butter is left to sit before churning so good bacteria grows and adds that rich butter taste. The butter you're used to eating, they artificially add that butter flavor back in."  

Elizabeth, along with her husband Drew, hired executive pastry chef, Kat King to help them develop their recipes. They now focus on three compound flavors, plus a lightly salted, sea salt and unsalted butter, then of course, seasonal compound varieties for when the inspiration strikes. 

Like the day of my visit when Mary Ellen Yupari, the Manager of Operations, just so happened to be trying out a new seasonal flavor of Georgia peach with local, organic honey, cinnamon and sugar. It smelled divine. I picked up the final result at the Grant Park Farmer's Market a few days ago and I have to say, although I may be partial, this is my new favorite. 

Chefs, Catherine Weaver and Jennifer Weissman work beautifully as a team mixing, churning, washing, molding, weighing and packing Banner Butter rounds. They love working with cultured butter and talking about their process. It really makes a difference when you know your food is crafted with this much care and passion. 

Cultured butter is so creamy and tasty, you often find yourself eating it like frosting from a cake. Elizabeth and Drew source their cream from Southern Swiss Dairy Farm in Georgia- from cows that are hormone free and grass fed. Each small batch at Banner takes 20 hours to make. It's a labor of love- can't you just tell? 

Elizabeth is passionate about her butter and the way she works with her staff (whom adore her) lets me know even bigger and better things are on the horizon. Both her and Drew have found a new passion through their foray into the food world which has received rave reviews and incredible support. Elizabeth, "I feel more connected to community. We're making something really traditional and it grounds you in a special, beautiful way." Oh butter, who knew our love could get this good? 

Check out the Banner Butter site to learn more and follow their ever so lovely Instagram account, produced by Ruthie Weil. 

 

Photos: Sweet Peach; Whitney Ott; Garnish & Gather     Content: Sweet Peach


Tuesday
Jul012014

More lovely things...via Wit and Whistle

Wit & Whistle is one of my favorite shops to check in on from time to time. Each item is beautifully made and then, with equal parts thoughtfulness and care, beautifully photographed and presented.  

Amanda Wright, from Cary, North Carolina, continues to expand her wares to include stationery and home goods. All of her paper products are printed locally on recycled paper and her line of creative, quirky stamps have a simple design that is both modern and playful. 

All of Amanda's popular wood-mounted rubber stamps are laser engraved from her original designs and are each packaged inside a drawstring muslin bag.  

I am a bit of a notebook fanatic as I tend to have a lot of ideas that should be written down- otherwise, they're quickly lost into oblivion. A pretty notebook, as seen here, is the perfect accessory (much like a pen in my hand) to help me focus and organize all those things floating around in my head and start to make sense of it...

Amanda also sells her original artwork. This is a mixed media painting, using gouache and ink, of her heart-leaf philodendron plant. She's such a talented one...and so fun to check in on. See the entirety of the Wit & Whistle shop, here. 

 

Photos: Wit & Whistle      Content: Sweet Peach