Feels Like Home...

I think everyone has an idea of what their ideal home would be. For others, it is revealed to them upon first sight, smell, feel... they just know it's right. Which is how it happened for William H. Dean when he visited the Northern Neck section of coastal Virginia, five years ago.

When William set his sights on 16 acres of land by the Chesapeake Bay- land that was deforested and depleted from decades of farming and misuse, he just knew he wanted to build there as well as restore the beauty of the bay. It took years in the making but the result is a 4,145 square foot home that is divided into two structures- one for private quarters, another for entertaining. The two areas are connected by a glass enclosed bridge and over 100 wooden pilings were used to raise the house above the floodplain. 

This impressive looking home has an equally impressiver interior. The large walnut and stainless steel dining table was designed by Dale Overmyer Architects (who also designed the home). The striking snowflake pendant is from David Trubridge while the fireplace is made with oyster shell encrusted concrete which was salvaged from the Oyster Plant that once stood on the site. I always love when new homes take a bit from what once was...

William's interior designer was Elizabeth Hague of Washington DC, who chose these pretty bedroom sconces from Palmer Hargrave. The grand tub comes via Jason International; faucets are Hansgrohe Axor Starck; Light from Moooi.

William smartly spent over a million dollars restoring the land around the home. Truckloads of fresh, nutrient-filled soil were brought in to allow the native plants, marsh grasses and shrubs to thrive. Landscape architects from Oehme, van Sweden oversaw the careful restoration which also included the planting of 220 new trees. 

This is a pretty nice place to kick back and relax and absorb all the beauty mother nature has to offer. I'm eternally jealous of William's accomplishment but also inspired to find my own piece of paradise. I'm keeping my eyes open...

 

Photos: Tony Cenicola/The New York Times       Content: Sweet Peach