Race & Religious

The best part about Friday is that it often denotes the start of a weekend getaway. I'm actually on my way to Thomasville, Georgia with Emily Myers to blog about Sweet Grass Dairy and the Firefly shop- which I'm very excited about. And it got me thinking of Airbnb. When I started perusing their site, I found this amazing complex for nightly rental in New Orleans. It's called Race & Religious. 

Named after two streets that intersect closeby, Race and Religious consists of two antebellum homes, three courtyards and a pool. Plus, the passion of the place ensures you have never stayed anywhere quite like this before...

Over the course of thirty years, owner Granville Semmes (the founder of 1-800 Flowers), restored and renovated the properties built in 1836. Inside, you'll find the original masonry made of bricks from Mississippi River clay. Granville also preserved 95% of the moldings and details. The loveliest mismatched rugs have been placed throughout as well as a mix of old Italian and antique country French furnishings. 

There are four bedrooms total as well as two bars, two kitchens and numerous sitting rooms and reading nooks. Every door and window is unique and there are endless purposeful details throughout both homes that will keep you transfixed and inspired...

You'll notice a bridge (with a trap door) that connects one of the antebellum homes to the old slave quarters. Granville transformed the space into a sitting area. 

Steeped in antebellum tradition and southern nostalgia, the Race & Religious compound is often refrerred to as a love song to New Orleans. If you're traveling with a group, I do believe this would be an amazing place to stop and rest your weary feet. Learn more about the Race & Religious experience, here. I hope this inspires you to get out and explore this weekend. I'll be with Emily, causing trouble no doubt. Made even more fun as we'll be stuffing our faces with wine, cheese and jam the entire time. And why not? It's the weekend afterall...

 

Photos: Air bnb; Race and Religious site; Final pic, Michael Caswell       Content: Sweet Peach